Why A Stainless Steel Ball Valve 1/2 Inch Is A Better Choice Anytime...

There are many different types of ball valve available on the market, both in hardware stores and online stores, each one with specific features and applications. This can make it hard to decide which one is right for your purposes, particularly if you haven’t used one before. A stainless steel ball valve ½ inch is just one type ideal with a variety of uses. Here are just a few advantages: 1. Stainless Steel The material of your valve should be a prime concern, along with the specific type of valve you choose. The reason stainless steel is so valued amongst home brewers and professional industries is that it is less corrosive than other metals, particularly brass. This results in less contamination of the final product, and a longer lasting valve. 2. Ease of Use The reason that a stainless steel ball valve ½ inch is also called a brewing ball valve is because it is so favored amongst home brewers over other valves. It is more light weight, compact, easily customizable, and low cost. 3. Easy to Clean The easy assembly and disassembly means it is easy to install and also to take apart and clean, which can take as little as a few minutes. This ease of sanitation is especially important for home brewers as a contaminated beer could result in an entire batch being disposed of. 4. Economical These types of valves tend to last a long time with correct maintenance. This not only reduces the amount of contaminated batches down to zero but also means that for the low one off price, the valve will last for a long time before it needs to be replaced. Whether it is for home brewing or an industrial purpose, a ½ inch stainless steel...

Structural Steel Fabrication Shops In Modern Times...

In today’s urban landscape, skyscrapers tower increasingly higher. Whether you live in Paris or Cleveland, the need for material to withstand the load and other factors is a basic requirement for building such tall structures. While iron was the original metal of choice in the 1700s, the modern preference is for structural steel. Fabrication of this metal in the late 19th and early 20th centuries was responsible for the rise (pun intended) of skyscrapers. Popularity of Structural Steel In the United States, structural steel has cornered the market for both multistory residential and non-residential construction. It accounts for approximately 49% of all such structural components. The only material that comes even close is concrete at around 30%. Customers for structural steel include a wide array of industrial structures. The largest percentage includes the following groups:  * Open-air stadiums  * Processing and chemical plants,  * Power plants  * Petroleum refineries According to 2013 statistics, these demand 38 % of the market while another 23% goes to various applications that are nonstructural in character. A list of such applications consists of various rack systems as well as trailers and even mobile homes. Structural Steel Fabrication Shops At one point, the fabrication of structural steel production occurred in large plants and manufacturing concerns. Today, fabrication shops in Cleveland and around the globe tend to be smaller. This does not diminish their competitiveness or capabilities. It is merely a reflection of changing economic times and the application of technology to reduce the need for larger facilities and considerable staffing. The smaller shops are capable of handling both large and small jobs. Larger firms once handled only huge projects. They depended enormously on a constant stream of such work to maintain staff of hundreds. On the other hand, smaller...

Screw Threads and The Threading Operation...

Screw threads are not a new invention. This device, that is responsible for such things as screw conveyors, dates back to the Greek scientist and mathematician Archimedes (c. 287 BCE- 212/211 BCE). The stated date of invention is 250 BCE. From then on, wooden screws were the norm. Artisans used their skills to produce them by hand until the 1797 when Henry Maudslay (1771-1831), an English mechanical engineer became the founder of the machine-tool industry by inventing the screw cutting lathe. This made uniformity in screws and future threading operation technology more than a possibility. Screws and Standardization Until Maudslay manufacturers produced screws with a distinct lack of uniformity in screw threads. The number of threads varied dramatically from manufacturer to manufacturer making any standard impossible to achieve. However, in spite of Maudslay’s work, the situation remained chaotic until World War I broke out. In that era, the American National (AN) thread form was established. It remained the standard until World War II of all major threads produced in America. However, around the globe, not all conformed to the AN standard. During World War II and American, British and Canadian allies worked on tank and other military equipment construction, issues of compatibility arose. The screws were not interchangeable. These presented problems that the countries did not overcome until following the cessation of the war. In 1948, a new standard arose. This, agreed upon by many countries, became known as the Unified thread form. It is in universal usage. It also affects what products emerge from the threading operation of a machine shop. What Exactly Is Thread Turning?  Thread turning is, at its most basic, the production of threads – male or female. It involves the use of such tools as universal lathes and CNC machining....

Reasons Firearm Finishing Really Matters...

The firearms of today are a far cry from those manufactured even in the last decade. Today, precision components and new technology allow the use of different alloys and different finishing options to create a weapon that is more accurate, lasts longer and has lower levels of maintenance requirements. When thinking about firearm finishing, remember each component is finished, it is not just the exterior appearance and surface that goes through the process. With each part of the weapon more accurately produced the entire system operates more smoothly. This not only adds to the accuracy of the weapon but also lowers wear and tear on internal parts because of incorrect fit or surface irregularities causing friction during firing. Limiting the Need for Lubrication Finished parts are free from even minor surface irregularities, burrs and rough areas. The quality of the finish will depend on the method used as well as the choice of the media and the process. The smoother the surface the less need there will be for lubrication for the weapon’s action. This will allow the gun to be fired more between cleanings and lubrication. Without the excessive oil less dirt and debris will not collect in the moving parts of the weapon, further reducing wear. Less friction in the weapon allows for faster chambering of the round and smoother action of the bolt. This simple advantage of firearm finishing leads to fewer problems when firing weapons, particularly with the semi-automatic and automatic weapons. This also means a faster cyclical rate and less chance of heat issues becoming a problem when firing multiple rounds. For military weapons, this is a critical factor. Corrosion Protection With efficient and effective firearm finishing on all parts and components the weapon life extends significantly, as does...

Metal Fabricators: Basic Concepts Of Metal Fabrication...

Today’s industries rely on metal fabricators to provide them with the components they require to produce high quality, reliable products. Metal fabrication shops work hard to provide a variety of services to their customers. Some shops are generalists. Others are specialists in certain areas. Some choose to handle custom metal fabrication only. Defining Metal Fabrication Metal fabrication is the act of designing, constructing and even repairing diverse metal components or entire products. The parts the shops work on can be small or large. They may be part of a small batch or a large run. The initial work may be even be a prototype. It can also be a familiar mass-produced component produced and reproduced several times before. Metal fabrication takes raw metal. It then prepares it for the actual work. Upon finishing cleaning and other related aspects, it turns it into the desired form through one or more techniques based. The guidelines are both the requirements of the customer and set specifications. When it comes to fabrication work, a shop may perform all or some of the following tasks:  * Assembly  * Bending  * Brazing  * Coating: Including powder coating or painting  * Casting  * Cutting – Including CNC enabled devices, laser or plasma systems  * Design/modeling  * Detailing  * Folding  * Forming – automated versions include CNC forming  * Machining  * Painting  * Punching  * Shaping  * Shearing: This is also referred to as cutting  * Spinning  * Stamping Welding: Various kinds of welding are possible including MIG, TIG, Spot, Stick and Field Metal fabricators consider these to be value-added processes. Employees may perform them manually or use CNC assisted devices. These require a programmer to insure each project is handled correctly. In some shops, certain actions, including welding, are turned over...

Troubleshooting Your Farm Hydraulic Equipment...

Do you have a loader with a hydraulic steering cylinder problem? Maybe your log splitter is making funny noises. Here are some common hydraulic problems you may face in the agricultural industry, along with some possible solutions. Fluid Leaks No one wants to look under a piece of equipment and see a puddle of hydraulic oil. However, this can happen to anyone at any given time. It’s important to take care of leaks as soon as possible to avoid serious trouble. In some cases, you may only need to tighten down a fitting or two. Look to see if there is a problem with a hose. Hoses should not be stiff and brittle and if so, there may be cracks in them which are difficult to detect. When in doubt, replace old hoses when you change fluid and filter. Look to see if relief valves are the source of your leak. If fluid appears to be coming from your hydraulic steering cylinder, you may need to replace the cylinder or the seals. Funny Noises If you notice unusual sounds while operating your equipment, something may be wrong. Many strange sounds develop when air gets into the system. In fact, it can cause some cylinders to make loud knocking or banging sounds as the air becomes compressed and then decompressed. If you notice odd noises and the fluid appears foamy, you almost certainly have a problem with air in your system. Air can enter in a number of ways. Air can cause your fluid to break down quickly and lose its ability to lubricate. This can contribute to premature damage and wear to seals, causing fluid leaks. Check to see if the fluid reservoir is low. If so, you probably have a leak and air...