Rotating Equipment Alignment Basic Rundown For Industrial Performers...

Two connected pieces of equipment by way of flex coupling live longer and perform better under an adequate rotating equipment alignment schedule. Seal failures rise up out of operational imbalances. Even heat and vibration – necessary occurrences when devices do what they do – take a toll on seals and bearings. Misalignment drives up electricity consumption rates in multiples. Properly aligned shafts should be face to face without angles or parallel comparisons. Timing, precision, and mechanical effects create what most know as alignment between two units. Of course, external imbalances such as something not resting on the base can be easy to spot. A soft foot is the worst enemy when things call for perfect equipment alignment adherence. Definitely, there are two things no technician desires to see: motor stress due to imbalance or consistent inaccurate timing. A millwright field-service provider establishes an axial distance between shaft ends before beginning any repairs. Then they measure the gap angles in the horizontal and vertical positions and make decisions based on their findings. Adding shims to the motor for tilt adjusts final readings, ensuring that they remain the same upon further investigation. This method corrects vertical discrepancies. For horizontal issues, pushing the unit forward from first person position is used instead. Both simple but functional methods take good care of pesky angular challenges. Straight edged measuring devices in combination with a feeler gauge determine the extent of parallel misalignment. Sometimes, specialists deal with a combination. Rotating equipment relies on axial forces so is subject to this type of misalignment as well. Be the first to...